Ewart WHEN ARMAGEDDON CAME Neuve Chapelle YPRES Bourlon BRIGADE OF GUARDS Arras

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Seller: dilapsus (6,682) 100%, Location: Flamborough, Yorkshire, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 381766971721 When Armageddon Came Studies in Peace and War by Wilfrid Ewart This is the March 1933 Second impression, issued in the same month as the First Edition, formerly from the Library of Brendan Bracken, 1st Viscount Bracken, PC (15 February 1901 – 8 August 1958), Minister of Information from 1941 to 1945, after serving as Winston Churchill's Parliamentary Private Secretary. Frontispiece Front cover and spine Further images of this book are shown below Publisher and place of publication Dimensions in inches (to the nearest quarter-inch) London: Rich & Cowan Ltd 4¾ inches wide x 7½ inches tall Edition Length March 1933 Second impression, issued in the same month as the First Edition 368 pages Condition of covers Internal condition Original brown cloth blocked in white on the spine, however, some of the title lettering has rubbed off. This volume is ex-Library and there is a stain around the lower part of the spine and covers from the removal of an old shelf label. The spine ends and corners are bumped. The images below give a good indication of the current state of the covers. There is a bookplate on the front pastedown of Viscount Bracken of Christchurch, and another bookplate of Sedbergh School (please see the image below). There are no other internal markings and the text is clean throughout. The paper has tanned with age. There is occasional foxing. Dust-jacket present? Other comments No Generally very clean apart from the removal of the shelf label from the spine, and with two bookplates on the front pastedown, one being that of Viscount Bracken of Christchurch. Illustrations, maps, etc Contents There is a frontispiece illustration (shown above). Please see below for details Post & shipping information Payment options The packed weight is approximately 600 grams. Full shipping/postage information is provided in a panel at the end of this listing. Payment options : UK bidders: cheque (in GBP), debit card, credit card (Visa, MasterCard but not Amex), PayPal International bidders: credit card (Visa, MasterCard but not Amex), PayPal Full payment information is provided in a panel at the end of this listing. When Armageddon Came Contents IN THE WAY OF PEACE The Passing of a Victorian St. Martinsell Londoners IN THE WAY OF WAR Two Mornings At Neuve Chapelle After Ypres A Memory of Bourlon Wood In an Old French City Three Days A Vision of Paris Pill-Boxes The Brigade of Guards AFTERMATH Solitude and Salisbury Plain A Pilgrimage Aubers Revisited After Four Years Ghosts of Arras Return to Paris WITH PEACE REGAINED Young Men of England Young Women of Modern England When Armageddon Came A Memory of Bourlon Wood In the grey first light of a mid-November morning, a certain battalion of a famous regiment set out upon its march along one of those roads which, having traversed the Somme battle-field, strikes across the waste ex-German tract of country south-east of Bapaume. There was not much cheer to the heart. For a damp, wind-riven mist partially veiled the landscape, while from a fitful quarter blew a breeze that threatened to cut one in two. The kits were late, the quartermaster was annoyed; the breakfast had to be eaten by candle-light under circumstances of chilly confusion which, if possible, enhanced its nastiness; most of the cups, plates, knives and forks had been already packed up. These misfortunes are, apparently, inseparable from an early move. Everybody " strafes," muttering oaths and curses. Nevertheless the men were in great form and tramped along right sturdily, fit after a week of hard marching, and reinforced by the belief that the British Army had " broken through" (blessed phrase!) at last, that the Boches were on the run, that the Tanks were driving all before them, and that the cavalry had entered Cambrai several hours previously. Of these stirring events not a word had reached England in advance, nor had any reliable information leaked out in the hot-beds of gossip and " back chat" prior to November 20. Nearer the Front little was known, and, as generally happens, the wildest canards obtained credence. Certain it was that on the 22nd, artillery and transport were pouring along the eastward roads, while the unceasing thunderous and often swelling chorus of the guns bespoke a tremendous battle. Towards that sound a whole brigade marched through the dim hours after dawn till the hard cold steel of a winter's day tempered somewhat the hard cold steel of a wintry land. By villages extremely and utterly wrecked; past orchards whose every tree had been neatly sliced in half; across a grey prairie of waving ashen grass, interspersed with bleak, young oak-woods and stretches of cultivated land long since run to seed. Ridge succeeded ridge with troughs and hollows in between, rolling away into distance like a Canadian prairie. And always on either side the road for miles ahead those silent companions, the poplars, those mute watchers which speed the marching companies along the roads of France. Of human life there was no sign; of war there was every sign. Endless strings of artillery, transport and horses, motor-cyclists, and mounted orderlies, motor lorries, white tents gleaming from distant ridges and strips of naked woodland, aeroplanes that droned backwards and forwards overhead, batteries that banged away to right and left. Down in a hollow on the hither side of a battered village we came about the middle of the morning upon a bare piece of ground and a pile of unpitched tents. There was—just nothing. But in a twinkling thirty or forty tents appeared, fires were got going, food was cooking, an extreme briskness succeeded the emptiness, and—lo! a camp. The keen wind blew, the grass waved, the cold grey clouds went sailing overhead, and every now and then a gleam of pale sunshine lit up the countryside. A great spurt of flame, followed at an interval by a sullen boom that hit one like a shock, indicated the presence of a 12-inch howitzer in a small wood near by. And every two or three minutes a German shell would burst on the Bapaume—Cambrai road, whose course along the crest of the ridge was marked by the inevitable line of trees. The thunder of the battle was continuous, now rising, now falling, so tantalising that one felt impelled to mount a neighbouring hill—whence, however, nothing could be seen but ridge and hollow, ridge and hollow that suggested the everlasting sea. It was an afternoon of preparation—of that bustling preparation which necessarily precedes a battle. The camouflage kits were produced, the water-bottles filled, haversacks loaded, revolvers cleaned, extra ammunition and bombs issued, and so forth. Thus the hours slipped by. Night came early, and it was a night splashed and spangled with the gleam of innumerable camp-fires. Around these fires and braziers could be seen groups of men, warming their hands, and boiling water in their mess-tins, their faces richly lit up, softened or grave, or made merry by the dancing flames. Loud was the laughter and the singing of songs, uproarious at times the exchange of compliments from one fireside to another. A stranger might imagine that of all these noisy fellows none had a care in the world. Presently some of the more sober mounted a little ridge that formed one side of the hollow in which camp had been pitched. Thence a familiar but magnificent spectacle presented itself. Along the dark horizon flickered the flashes of countless guns; here and there rose coloured Verey-lights, red and green, yellow and white—lonely they looked and far away—and golden-shower rockets, and other powerful rockets that seemed to cast their glimmer even back here. There may have been greater night spectacles in the war, but seldom a horizon so far-flung, so panoramic. It was like a vast open amphitheatre enclosing within its walls of sky all the storm and passion, the mystery and obscurity of human life. Watching from that high spot was like a man at his birth, whose unseeing eye looks out into the future with its glimmerings of hope and fate,and its little lonely lights and its vast unknown shadows. Only in this scene there was found a sombre note, something wild and melancholy, something closer akin to the end of life than to its beginning. It was pleasanter to look up and find the serenely twinkling starlight that never changed, that was on the whole kind. At ten o'clock the battalion moved, and all that night we marched and marched. Often the narrow road, whose surface was pitted and rough, became alive with transport. Progress, therefore, was slow. Dug-outs—many of them snug-looking and warm—honeycombed the banks on either side, and as we approached the old British line and the Hindenburg line beyond, communication trenches and disused trench systems began to appear on either hand. We passed into the area of field-batteries, and from pools of miry blackness would burst forth suddenly a vivid sheet of flame, followed by the piercing reports of field-guns—one, two, three, four. Then came the flotsam and jetsam of the battle-field with white-bandaged fingers, arms, and hands, walking and extremely cheerful. " What'll you give for mine ? " says one; and to each in turn the men shout, " Is it a Blighty ? " So they stroll back and we go forward again. Then one by one, and afterwards in twos and threes, came the stretcher-parties—bearing, as it were stealthily, each its burden a perfectly still figure shrouded in a dark blanket. " Make way for the stretcher " would be passed down the column every few minutes. We must have crossed the Hindenburg line, scarcely knowing, about the middle of the night. So dark was it you could only discern occasional belts of barbed wire or German stakes, and opening from the roadside banks great deep trenches that appeared to face westward. Presently we were on the broad open highway. On one side squatted an abandoned Tank. A little farther on three dead horses lay in the roadway, but there was nothing to show that we were in country which had been German five days before. No shells came near. Once the column halted to let a battery fire immediately across its front; once in a big village that in its silence and shattered solitude was a little uncanny. Then out in the open country with the Verey lights marking a wide semicircle, and the keen wind singing through the telegraph wires, though now that the circulation was stirred by hard walking it hurt no more. The chatter of machine guns came nearer, but it was spasmodic, and the night remained unexpectedly quiet. Presently—it must have been near daybreak—the guide halted before a square hole in the ground which, on peering down, disclosed steps leading deep into the bowels of the earth. It was a German dug-out. Descending we found a square room with table and chairs; another room with cooking-stove and benches; and, opening off the first, two small cells with wire-netting beds in two tiers, like cabins on board ship. Nor was it long before a meal had been prepared, after which everybody, heartened and refreshed, lay down to sleep in great comfort. Morning had passed nearly into afternoon before anyone felt inclined to mount the steps and survey the country which last night, of course, had been completely invisible. There lay the Cambrai battle-field, spread out as in a picture under the bleak nor'-easter, a much more definite and circumscribed thing than most battle-fields. In this landscape the dominant feature was Bourlon Wood, whose dark shape rose high on its crested hill, overlooking the surrounding country . . . Biographical Note "WILFRID HERBERT GORE EWART was a well-known writer in the years after the First World War until his dramatic death at the end of 1922. He established himself by writing graphic accounts of life in the trenches for The Times and the Spectator from 1914-17, and after he returned home he produced rural, social and literary articles for various publications. His novel, Way of Revelation, was published in I921, and a travel book about Ireland the following year. His detailed and clear style gives his work a lucidity and freshness which has not lost its appeal, and his writing is also interesting for the picture which it gives us of life and attitudes during and after the Great War. Wilfrid was born on 19 May 1892, into a family with strong military connections. The Ewarts were an established army family of high-ranking officers, while his mother, a Gore, was descended from the Napiers of India and the Peninsular War. Wilfrid showed no promise of following the family tradition luring his childhood. He had inherited the physical delicacy of his mother. He had a 'lazy eye', with limited vision in the other, and was too delicate to attend normal school. He went in St Aubyns, Rottingdean, a private school near Brighton, before being sent to a private tutor at Parkstone, then a salubrious area of Bournemouth. During his vacations he would spend long holidays in the Tyrol with his father. As a youth, Wilfrid spent some years on a farm in Bottisham, in the Fens. Here he developed a great love of the countryside and a fascination with birds and poultry. He wrote articles for Feathered World and other agricultural journals and had his work on poultry published. At twenty-one he was a slim six foot two, with blond hair and grey imperfect eyes, and was about to take a post as a secretary to the Princess Dolgoruki in Berkshire when war was declared. In spite of his health and his poor eyesight he considered that he had no alternative but to become a private soldier. His cousin, Master of Ruthven, and a major in the Scots Guards, arranged a favourable medical, and Wilfrid was soon training with the Guards at Caterham. He was leaving not only his career, but also his social circle, which included his friend since childhood, George Wyndham, and, apparently, a lady who did not reciprocate his love. He was quiet and reserved, with a correct and rather imposing exterior hiding an attractive and sincere personality, which was to be shaken and strengthened by the horrors of the years ahead, when he would lose many relations and friends, including Wyndham and his new brother-in-law, John Farmer. It was in the trenches in France that Wilfrid was introduced to Stephen Graham, a private in the same regiment, already an acknowledged writer and authority on Russia. Graham was ten years older than Ewart, and was to exercise a considerable influence on his future development. A True Tale of Three Days, written after Wilfrid had been home on sick leave in 1915, because of a leg injury, provided the kernel for the later novel. In 1917 Ewart fell from his horse, suffered concussion, and was sent home. His fighting days were over. Encouraged by Graham, he refused an army posting at the end of the war, thus enabling himself to concentrate on his writing, and an exploration of people and places in post-war London. Disaster struck in March 1922 he suffered an incapacitating nervous breakdown, which prevented him physically from writing. For three months he rested, and then in June he accepted a commission to write the history of the Scots Guards for his former regiment. In December 1922, Ewart decided on the spur of the moment to go down to Mexico City where he spent New Year's Eve with the Grahams, returning near midnight to his hotel, where he prepared for bed. The next day his dead body was found, near his balcony, by Graham; he had been shot through his left eye. It is presumed that, attracted by the sounds of New Year revelry outside, he had gone to the balcony, and been killed by a stray bullet. As news of his death reached the British public, he was buried at the British Cemetery in Mexico City." Please note: to avoid opening the book out, with the risk of damaging the spine, some of the pages were slightly raised on the inner edge when being scanned, which has resulted in some blurring to the text and a shadow on the inside edge of the final images. Colour reproduction is shown as accurately as possible but please be aware that some colours are difficult to scan and may result in a slight variation from the colour shown below to the actual colour. In line with eBay guidelines on picture sizes, some of the illustrations may be shown enlarged for greater detail and clarity. There is a bookplate on the front pastedown of Viscount Bracken of Christchurch, and another bookplate of Sedbergh School. IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR PROSPECTIVE BUYERS U.K. buyers: To estimate the “packed weight” each book is first weighed and then an additional amount of 150 grams is added to allow for the packaging material (all books are securely wrapped and posted in a cardboard book-mailer). The weight of the book and packaging is then rounded up to the nearest hundred grams to arrive at the postage figure. I make no charge for packaging materials and do not seek to profit from postage and packaging. Postage can be combined for multiple purchases. Packed weight of this item : approximately 600 grams Postage and payment options to U.K. addresses: Details of the various postage options (for example, First Class, First Class Recorded, Second Class and/or Parcel Post if the item is heavy) can be obtained by selecting the “Postage and payments” option at the head of this listing (above). Payment can be made by: debit card, credit card (Visa or MasterCard, but not Amex), cheque (payable to "G Miller", please), or PayPal. Please contact me with name, address and payment details within seven days of the end of the auction; otherwise I reserve the right to cancel the auction and re-list the item. Finally, this should be an enjoyable experience for both the buyer and seller and I hope you will find me very easy to deal with. If you have a question or query about any aspect (postage, payment, delivery options and so on), please do not hesitate to contact me, using the contact details provided at the end of this listing. International buyers: To estimate the “packed weight” each book is first weighed and then an additional amount of 150 grams is added to allow for the packaging material (all books are securely wrapped and posted in a cardboard book-mailer). The weight of the book and packaging is then rounded up to the nearest hundred grams to arrive at the shipping figure. I make no charge for packaging materials and do not seek to profit from shipping and handling. Shipping can usually be combined for multiple purchases (to a maximum of 5 kilograms in any one parcel with the exception of Canada, where the limit is 2 kilograms). Packed weight of this item : approximately 600 grams International Shipping options: Details of the postage options to various countries (via Air Mail) can be obtained by selecting the “Postage and payments” option at the head of this listing (above) and then selecting your country of residence from the drop-down list. For destinations not shown or other requirements, please contact me before buying. Tracked and "Signed For" services are also available if required, but at an additional charge to that shown on the Postage and payments page, which is for ordinary uninsured Air Mail delivery. Due to the extreme length of time now taken for deliveries, surface mail is no longer a viable option and I am unable to offer it even in the case of heavy items. I am afraid that I cannot make any exceptions to this rule. Payment options for international buyers: Payment can be made by: credit card (Visa or MasterCard, but not Amex) or PayPal. I can also accept a cheque in GBP [British Pounds Sterling] but only if drawn on a major British bank. Regretfully, due to extremely high conversion charges, I CANNOT accept foreign currency : all payments must be made in GBP [British Pounds Sterling]. This can be accomplished easily using a credit card, which I am able to accept as I have a separate, well-established business, or PayPal. Please contact me with your name and address and payment details within seven days of the end of the auction; otherwise I reserve the right to cancel the auction and re-list the item. Finally, this should be an enjoyable experience for both the buyer and seller and I hope you will find me very easy to deal with. If you have a question or query about any aspect (shipping, payment, delivery options and so on), please do not hesitate to contact me, using the contact details provided at the end of this listing. Prospective international buyers should ensure that they are able to provide credit card details or pay by PayPal within 7 days from the end of the auction (or inform me that they will be sending a cheque in GBP drawn on a major British bank). Thank you. (please note that the book shown is for illustrative purposes only and forms no part of this auction) Book dimensions are given in inches, to the nearest quarter-inch, in the format width x height. Please note that, to differentiate them from soft-covers and paperbacks, modern hardbacks are still invariably described as being ‘cloth’ when they are, in fact, predominantly bound in paper-covered boards pressed to resemble cloth. Fine Books for Fine Minds I value your custom (and my feedback rating) but I am also a bibliophile : I want books to arrive in the same condition in which they were dispatched. For this reason, all books are securely wrapped in tissue and a protective covering and are then posted in a cardboard container. If any book is significantly not as described, I will offer a full refund. Unless the size of the book precludes this, hardback books with a dust-jacket are usually provided with a clear film protective cover, while hardback books without a dust-jacket are usually provided with a rigid clear cover. The Royal Mail, in my experience, offers an excellent service, but things can occasionally go wrong. However, I believe it is my responsibility to guarantee delivery. If any book is lost or damaged in transit, I will offer a full refund. Thank you for looking. Please also view my other listings for a range of interesting books and feel free to contact me if you require any additional information Design and content © Geoffrey Miller Condition: A detailed description of this item's current condition is given in the listing below but please do not hesitate to contact me (gm@flamboroughmanor.co.uk) if you require any further information., Non-Fiction Subject: History & Military, Language: English, Format: Hardback, Subject: History & Military, Sub-Subject: First World War, Printing Year: 1900-1949, Condition: Used, Further Details: Studies in War and Peace Social History, Author: Wilfrid Ewart, Binding: Hardback, Year Printed: 1933, Place of Publication: London, Publisher: Rich & Cowan Ltd

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